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Giant Box of Strangers 

“It’s not adolescence that’s the problem,” insists Faris. “It’s the giant box of strangers.” From Why You Truly Never Leave High School

Posted 66 months ago by

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Navigating the Theater of the Urban 

You are standing awkwardly with a group of sixty people or so, at 9pm on a deserted street somewhere in São Paulo, when the play begins by cutting through the mass, cleaving the tenuous bonds that hold you together, bonds which also become all the more essential. This is just the beginning. Soon the group …

Posted 67 months ago by

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Navigating as Curating 

I've commented elsewhere on the ills of lockstep illustration, in which talks are rendered as they are given. Not only does it betray a lack of faith in the audience, but it is also demeaning to the power of images. I recall a class I suffered, on "learning" in which the slides would be …

Posted 68 months ago by

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The Space Between Heads 

  There is always this funny moment. I'm nodding along—yep, yep, we can't reduce culture to discourse; there's gesture, activity, materiality—when it dawns on me: oh right, they nevertheless still imagine that we are essentially heads with wavy arms. Culture: what happens between the heads...

Posted 68 months ago by

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You got your robot in our robot! 

Exam body sorry over BattleTech robot blunder - The Age You can't make this stuff up. Or you all too easily could. Here's an article on how a BattleTech Marauder inserts itself an exam question on Nikolai Kochergin's Storming the Winter Palace on the Russian Revolution. VCE History: Revolutions exam apology BattleTech Marauder, Russia. I …

Posted 69 months ago by

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Precession and the Dolphin 

Precession, simply put, is a force that is generated as a side effect of another force, orthogonal to it. A stone dropped in water creates ripples. A tensegrity structure, squashed or pulled, will bow out or squeeze in at the free sides. A spun bike wheel, suspended from only one side of the axle, will …

Posted 70 months ago by

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Thresholds of São Paulo, Brazil: Minimal Performance as Inquiry 

I'll be heading to Brazil in the Spring to play with the intersection between learning, performing, and the city, as part of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics' annual Encuentro. I thought I'd share the write up for our project here, as a way of crossing some of the usual thresholds between education and …

Posted 71 months ago by

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Shadow Play and the Frozen Tableau 

I just came across this old interview with Victor I. Stoichita in Cabinet Magazine. He's discussing his fascinating, shall we say illuminating book, A Short History of the Shadow. But I am struck again with his characterization of Plato's Cave Allegory as a Sadistic tale. Not because I want to come to its defense—Plato is …

Posted 73 months ago by

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On Being Busted… 

Wherin I recount my run in with "the Man" in Paris... Minding the Gap: through a hole in the Parisian Sidewalk

Posted 73 months ago by

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The Protective Veil of Innocence/Ignorance 

'Did I tell you about Kapterev's experiments on suggestion? Sometimes it turns out that to hinder the hypnosis all you need is a thin veil. Herein lies the profound meaning of the Jaw - a woman wearing a Jata cannot tempt.' —Pavel Florensky, "...in a discussion with his friend EI'chaninov on Kapterev's hypnotic experiments" We, …

Posted 76 months ago by

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The Golden Insult 

Fortunately we have the web, and thus, now, the Lutheran Insulter. (To be clear, it entails insults by Luther, not insult to Lutherans.) If only so we can be reminded what an ass he could be. (Oh, sorry, that wasn't very creative. I'll try harder next time...) But every now and then he manages to …

Posted 78 months ago by

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On Keystone Cops 

There is a fascinating article over at The New Inquiry, on the figure of the cop in comedy. Fascinating not the least because I feel compelled to start my own work on education with jokes. (The funny thing about education jokes is that they are not funny.) The potential irrelevance of this inquiry remains to …

Posted 78 months ago by

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Thinking Through Drawing Symposium: Practice Into Knowledge 

Some reflections on coming together... "...the possibilities of what drawing is and the contexts in which it flourishes. Farthing engaged in something of a taxonomy of drawing, pushing the audience to consider the “outer extremities” of the practice, as Burton describes it. Showing an image of a plane taking off and casting a shadow, Farthing …


Reposted from Arts & Humanities. Written by Amy Wolf.

In a weekend that brought together leaders in such diverse fields as medicine, architecture, textile design and cognitive science and gave them a commonality, the Art and Art Education Department’s recent Thinking Through Drawing Symposium was a ground-breaking event and the first of its kind in the nation.  “This has been a long time coming,” …

Posted 80 months ago by

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When an adult took standardized tests forced on kids – The Washington Post 

Here's an interesting article, in the Washington Post, about an adminstrator who took his school system's own test: When an adult took standardized tests forced on kids - The Answer Sheet - The Washington Post. First, I'm way ahead of this, having written a while ago on that peculiar game show, Who's Smarter than a …

Posted 81 months ago by

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Abandoned Toys 

… As an artist friend of mine pointed out in response to this photo: On BBC crime shows, an abandoned children's toy is always a metaphor for "something horrendous happened to a child." Which got me thinking. What is it about this? If it were simply a question of restraint or reserve—a discomfort in showing …

Posted 81 months ago by

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Thought is for Moving 

If you think about this question for any length of time, it's blindingly obvious why we have a brain. We have a brain for one reason, and one reason only, and that is to produce adaptable and complex movements. —Daniel Wolpert I'll stop there before I transcribe the whole thing... Shortly after this, though, he …

Posted 81 months ago by

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Zappa on School 

Schools train people to be ignorant with style. As long as you are just smart enough to do a job, and just dumb enough to swallow what they feed you, you're going to be alright. Interestingly, I think this introduces something rather sophisticated. In order to learn how to do this, one would have to …

Posted 81 months ago by

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Henri & Henri on Movement 

People make gestures: they gesticulate. —Henri Lefebvre, Rhythmanalysis & It follows that sight and touch could not have given us the idea of space without the help of the "muscular sense." Not only could this concept not be derived from a single sensation, or even from a series of sensations; but a motionless being could …

Posted 82 months ago by

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Occupying Academe 

Sitting here, late at night, in a tower of Academe, I am writing about the occupation of Wall Street, thinking about how the trope of "occupation" has found such a strong resonance. I imagine it is in no small part because we have been raised on the images of education. Not the images within education, …

Posted 82 months ago by

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Thinking the Box 

Like nesting boxes, we find strangeness inside of strangeness in the Met's exhibition Thinking Outside the Box. I have a thing for boxes, being one of the enduring forms of educational imagery, and as such, never quite what they seem. (Indeed, the secret compartment, or the intricate display or grand room on the inside, hidden …

Posted 82 months ago by

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