Mask Image 1

Join Pressible, a link to sign up for Pressible

Splitting Skulls

Contact | Feed RSS Icon

Related Topics

Related Tags

education RSS Icon

20 posts
8 categories

Information Architecture: towards a collaborative library 

I've recently been happy with Mendeley's online reference management software. Like Evernote and Dropbox, it syncs up seemlessly across computers, browsers, and platforms, allowing you to keep your citations and PDF's at hand. But particularly interesting is their group function, which allows for sharing and collaboration. I've created a group for Edutecture, for anything exploring …

Posted 105 months ago by

Post a comment.

Variations on Euclid 

The roof is the shortest distance between two walls. —le Parkour maxim Education is unthinkable without it's geometry. The very gates to Plato's Academy make the prohibition clear, "Let none ignorant of geometry enter here." We could take it not merely as a shibboleth, the secret pronunciation that allows or disallows entrance to the clubhouse, …

Posted 105 months ago by

Post a comment.

The Death of Education 

The logical extension of my recent strategy of reviewing books I am still reading is to do so before I have even left the bookstore. In a way, then, it is only fitting that I am holding two books on death and burial. What could have more to do with beginnings and archives? And with …

Posted 106 months ago by

Post a comment.

In Search of Withdrawing Gods 

I was at the library today, playing detective, tracking down a lead. And I found myself musing on the layers of what I was doing. Someone wrote a book, it was translated, printed, then photographed and copied to microfiche, which I in turn was scanning as digital images, converting to PDF's, saving to the cloud, …

Posted 106 months ago by

Post a comment.

The Wonder Wheel 

Plato famously affirms that philosophy begins with wonder. This strikes me as at least revisionist. The comment of an old philosopher reminiscing on distant beginnings. Even if one imagines arche less as "beginning" than "principle." Are we to believe that philosophy is really so dreamy eyed? And is not this aspect of philosophy, at least, …

Posted 107 months ago by

34 Comment(s):

Education and the Rigorous Tying Up of Milk  ☆

It always surprises me when people seem to get away with the argument that we need better education in order to maintain our national primacy. Tired nationalism keeps on kicking. And yet, isn't it interesting how compelling it is in its apparent simplicity? Even as we become sensitive to the atrocities of Empire, the notion …

Posted 109 months ago by

4 Comment(s):

Philosophy in Bed 

Like the juvenile that knows that adding "...in bed" to the end of every sentence will likely be funny, provocative, or at least get a rise, doing Philosophy of Education often amounts to adding "...in the classroom" to the end of concepts. Spinoza as educator.... It at least matches, like the bedroom, education's pervasive yet …

Posted 109 months ago by

4 Comment(s):

Inheriting the Rubble – Eugenics and Behavior 

As a radical agnostic (sorry, can you repeat the question?) named "Christopher" (φέρω, pherō: to carry. You work it out....) I only have sympathy for those named "Eugene". Lord help them if it's meant specifically, these are our "good genes", or wishfully, here's to the utopian promise of good genes, or somehow both. Carriers and …

Posted 109 months ago by

34 Comment(s):

The Never Ending Story 

We live in the age of search. The question is not what is known, but what is next. Possible combinations. This video shows a machine that trawls patents, serving up an endless series of related patent drawings. But this is not so new, either. Georg Philipp Harsdörffer was fascinated, in the 17th century, by the …

Posted 110 months ago by

21 Comment(s):

Progressive Education & The Myth of Sisyphus  ☆

It has to make sense. Those things we bring ourselves to day after day. Or rather, do we not need them to promise, one day, to offer up their sense, retroactively. This is the work. Progress. But what is sense? Against what do we measure progress? King Sisyphus' problems started with the hubris of thinking …

Posted 110 months ago by

1 Comment(s):

Diane Ravitch 

I've recently discovered that the After Ed blog has a short video of Diane Ravitch discussing her latest book, The Death and Life of the Great American School System. (See below.) It's worth taking a look. Not because of the content, which is much better served by reading the book, but as an exercise in …


Reposted from After Ed TV. Written by After Ed Team.

Education historian, Diane Ravitch, gives an overview of her book, "The Death and Life of the Great American School System."

Posted 110 months ago by

2 Comment(s):

Zeno and the Art of Archery  ☆

Following up on the one about the bear, here's another joke having to do with education: A duke was hunting in the forest with his coterie of men-at-arms and servants, when he came across a tree with an arrow protruding, dead center, from a target painted on it. Marveling at the nice shot, they ride …

Posted 110 months ago by

27 Comment(s):

Heaven help us… 

During my talk, a few weeks ago, on virtual technology and its relationship to education, I argued that technology, applied to education, tends to be imagined as a kind of savior, rescuing education from it's banal reality. But it's not so simple: in fact, educational space has, from its beginnings, imagined itself as a virtual …

Posted 110 months ago by

4 Comment(s):

Sacrifice and Education – Part II 

Yesterday's post on dangerous T-shirts, academic bloodletting, and sacrifice continues... I've jumped ahead in Sacrifice: Its Nature and Function, to the "function" part, which seems to me particularly provocative for thinking about education. Hubert and Mauss, after sketching out the general schema of sacrifice, point out that this can be combined in any number of …

Posted 110 months ago by

Post a comment.

Home Schooling – From Fringe to Inevitable? 

The supreme irony would be if the real shift in education is not from public to charter schools, but that both could be eclipsed by what appears to be a drop in the bucket, the smallest possible unit of education: home-schooling. Representing, by its nature a fringe move in education, its marginal status hinges less …

Posted 111 months ago by

1 Comment(s):

The Illiad or the Poem of Force 

Short and powerful, like her sentences, Simone Weil's essay cuts to the center of things. The true hero, the true subject matter, the center of the Illiad is force. The force that men wield, the force that subdues men, in the face of which human flesh shrinks back. The human soul seems ever conditioned by …

Posted 113 months ago by

3 Comment(s):